Chimera propagation from bloomstalk

GROWING SUB-FORUM; General care, light, water, Temperature requirements, soil mix and propagation discussions by leaf and chimeras divisions.

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Chimera propagation from bloomstalk

Postby kbugs » Sun Jan 30, 2011 4:58 pm

Here is a wonderfully illustrated way to set a chimera bloomstalk for propagation. This is one of the best I have seen illustrated and the same method I use when I am not using Keiki grow, beheading, or sucker propagation:

It is in Russian and you have to wait for the translation:

http://flowerland.com.ua/page/article/r ... chimeras-1
Kay - MI Go n-eírí an bóthar leat
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Re: Chimera propagation from bloomstalk

Postby Stephen » Thu Feb 03, 2011 2:54 pm

Very interesting method. It will take quite some time to produce an abundance of plants for resale and trades. How do your other techniques compare? I will enjoy learning of the different ways to propagate. Thanks
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Re: Chimera propagation from bloomstalk

Postby kbugs » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:44 pm

Generally, you will find that chimeras are twice to three times the amount of a normal African violet, due to the time take it takes to propagate. It is not that it takes longer to propagate a chimera, but your yield of young plants is significantly less. And many growers will hold the young to see if they will bloom true to the parent. You may get one or two good viable babies from crown propagation or bloomstalk, but a leaf propagation can give you more plants than you bargained for. Myself, I will buy a nonblooming youngster, just to see what the bloom will be, that's half the fun.

Besides that no one can predict that a chimera from sucker will bloom true to the parent plant, it is impossible. There are a lot of stable chimeras out there, but many unstable ones as well, i.e. the sucker will sport different from the parent plant and produce a solid flower, etc. And just because you have a parent plant that has bloomed true time after time, doesn't mean its offspring will as well and for that matter, all of sudden the parent may decide to sport for no reason. So when you take all that into consideration and then the fact that it takes an African violet approximately nine months from time of propagation to full bloom you can see why it takes a lot for trades or sales. But that's why I love the chimeras, they are always a guessing game.

Kay
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Re: Chimera propagation from bloomstalk

Postby Stephen » Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:09 am

That certainly explains why one would expect to pay a premium for these over an African Violet.
It appears to be quite a delicate process almost requiring the steady hands of a surgeon
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